Download e-book Lesson Plans Between the Acts

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Lesson Plans Between the Acts file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Lesson Plans Between the Acts book. Happy reading Lesson Plans Between the Acts Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Lesson Plans Between the Acts at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Lesson Plans Between the Acts Pocket Guide.

Some scenes have been omitted from Act One in order to focus on the most critical content that aligns with lesson one on the rule of secrecy and plans on state representation and representation of the people. Scene 1 : Laying Down the Rules.

3 Act Tasks

May 25 : Constitutional Convention meets quorum requirement. May 28 : Committee on Rules Reports rules for Convention. Scene 2 : The 15 Resolutions of the Virginia Plan. May 29 : Virginia Plan introduced and defended by Randolph. Scene 4 : Madison-Sherman Exchange.

Wake Up King George!

June 11 : Popular representation in both branches? June 15 : New Jersey Plan introduced. June 19 : New Jersey Plan rejected. Activity 3: Discussing the Three Plans on Representation provides students the opportunity to analyze the three plans on representation in a Socratic seminar. Activity 4: Simulated Congressional Hearing on Representation at the Constitutional Convention of serves as an end of lesson group and individual assessment of student analysis on the three plans of representation including the introduction, amending, and rejection of plans presented at the Constitutional Convention of If your students lack experience in dealing with primary sources, you might use one or more preliminary exercises to help them develop these skills.

The teacher will open day one of the lesson by sharing that two statesmen, George Washington and James Madison were opposed the Articles of Confederation because the Articles allowed for robust and healthy state and local politics and a weak and divisive continental arrangement and called for a Grand Convention. The teacher should post and ask students to respond to the following statement using a think-pair-share strategy.

Why would the Framers of the Constitution approve the following rule at the Constitutional Convention of if a goal of the Convention was to produce a Constitution for the United States that would reflect a representative democratic republic? Once students complete the Share portion of the activity the teacher can use lesson extension one and have students discuss how Christy portrayed secrecy in his painting of the Constitutional Convention of portrayed secrecy.

Lesson extension two could also be used at this time for students to explore who was on the Rules Committee and what additional rules were made during the Constitutional Convention of Time required for activity: In class reading assignment and completing graphic organizer, two 45 minute class periods.

Students may complete individually or in small groups. The teacher should provide background information that at the Constitutional Convention of , one of the main tasks of the Framers was to decide on representation and powers of Congress.

The teacher should tell students that because of the secrecy rule, there was very little information about what was happening at the Constitutional Convention of In this lesson, the class is going to focus on how the Framers of the Constitution debated three plans that dealt with how the representatives of Congress would be determined and the powers of Congress. Minimally, students should record three ways each plan was similar and different using the comparison chart template. The teacher should review the scoring criteria for the comparison chart prior to students completing.

The key criteria that should be recorded on the comparison chart for each plan includes:.

Practice for Random Acts of Kindness Day • Life At the Intersection

Words the teacher should consider covering include: proportion, tribunal, provision, unicameral, bicameral and republican. One way to review is to use a word wall. The teacher will tell students that the class will be adding several words to the word wall today. Word walls are a literacy strategy that may be used before reading explicit teaching and modeling, during reading guided practice and after reading guided practice.

Lesson Planning - Part 1 - Why do we plan lessons?

After completing the Venn diagram on the three plans for representation at the Constitutional Convention of , students will be asked to consider why some Framers would support one plan over the other two plans presented in relation to how representatives of Congress would be selected and the powers granted to Congress. Students will eventually give a four minute oral presentation in a small group, see activity four.

To assist students in preparing for the oral testimony, students will participate in a Socratic seminar. Students will use their Venn Diagrams completed in Activity 2 to prepare for the Socratic seminar.

6th - 8th Grade

See the handout to learn more about Socratic Circles. See the Socratic circle rubric handout to assess students during the Socratic Seminar. Time required for activity: Two 45 minute class periods, one class period for preparation, one class period for presentations. After students complete the Socratic seminar, the teacher should assign students to small groups students.

To begin wrapping up the lesson and to assess both small group and individual mastery of the content within the plans of the convention, the teacher will have students participate in a simulated congressional hearing. In small groups students , students will be asked to give an oral testimony in which they will apply the information learned in this lesson.

Analysis should explain why the Virginia Plan was introduced and then amended and explain why the New Jersey Plan was introduced and then rejected. As a small group, students will prepare a four minute oral presentation which answers the following question:. Students should record their oral presentation on note cards. The oral presentation should include:. Each small group of students will give their oral testimony. The teacher should invite members of the school community or community to serve as mock members of Congress. The members of Congress will listen and evaluate the prepared oral testimony given by each small group of students.

The members of Congress will also have the opportunity to ask the small student groups up to six minutes of follow up questions. Suggested follow up questions may include: Which of the three plans do you prefer and why? The Simulated Congressional Hearing Scoring Criteria should be used to assess student oral testimonies. The teacher should review the Simulated Congressional Hearing Scoring Criteria with students and mock members of Congress before oral testimonies are developed. After completing this lesson, students should individually be able to write brief paragraphs responses to the following questions:.

Extension 2: Students may use Committee Assignments Chart to explore who was on the Rules Committee and what additional rules were made during the Constitutional Convention of Extension 4; Students may write a feature article about how a government under the New Jersey, Virginia or Hamilton Plan would respond to a present day current event. Add to Favorites. Why did the Framers hold the deliberations in secret? Learning Objectives: After completing this lesson, students should be able to: Explain how the secrecy rule at the Constitutional Convention intentionally allowed for deliberation to occur, a premise of representative democracy.

Note: Analysis should explain why the Virginia Plan was introduced and then amended and explain why the New Jersey Plan was introduced and then rejected. Most importantly, The National Legislature should consist of two branches. The Second Branch of the National Legislature should be elected by the first.

This Council will review laws passed by the National Legislature and have the power to reject the laws, unless the National Legislature can pass the act again. The National Legislature will create the National Judiciary. The structure will consist of one or more supreme tribunals and inferior tribunals.

Judges will be appointed for life, during good behavior.

Lesson Plan: Overview

State Legislatures, Executives, and Judges are to be bound by oath to support the Articles. The new plan for government should be ratified by the people, through assemblies of representatives chosen by the people.

Preparing to Teach this Lesson: Prior to teaching this lesson the teacher should cover content related to the Articles of Confederation and its weaknesses. Activity 1: The Rule of Secrecy serves as an instructional set for the lesson. Analyzing Primary Sources: If your students lack experience in dealing with primary sources, you might use one or more preliminary exercises to help them develop these skills.

The students should take a few moments probably not minutes just to THINK about the question and write a response on a sheet of paper. Using designated partners, students PAIR up to talk about the answer each came up with. They compare their written notes and identify the answers they think are best, most convincing, or most unique by summarizing their paired response.

After students talk in pairs for a few moments again, usually not minutes , the teacher calls for pairs to SHARE their thinking with the rest of the class. The teacher can do this by going around in round-robin fashion, calling on each pair; or the teacher can take answers as they are called out or as hands are raised. Often, the teacher or a designated helper will record these responses on the board or on the overhead.

Writing Contests. Mobile Coupons As part of its mission to help people save money throughout their lives, Stage of Life launched one of the first mobile coupon sites.


  1. 3 Act Tasks - SFUSD Mathematics.
  2. Post navigation?
  3. Kosher Jesus.
  4. Working with Secondary Students who have Language Difficulties.
  5. The Constitutional Convention — Lesson Plan for Act I.

You can view key Stage of Life discount and content using your smart phone. Just visit www.


  • Declaration of Independence: The Townshend Acts;
  • by Natalie Bolton and Gordon Lloyd;
  • 19 Gifts of the Spirit.
  • Living the Dream: 100 Acts of Kindness.
  • The Five Act Play (Dramatic Structure).
  • High School Sponsor. Writing Contest. Writing Contests Between and , StageofLife. Thousands of people, from teens to Baby Boomers participated. You'll find the stories and essays from these past writing contests throughout the site in each life stage. Wedding Married Baby.

    View Past Writing Contest Winners. Contact Us with questions about our writing contests. Contact Us if you know an author or celebrity who has writing advice for teens or would like to donate a signed copy of their book. Word of the Day We featured a new vocab word each day Use our Word of the Day as inspiration for a personal essay or blog post on StageofLife. Notes to the Teacher Visit our "Notes to the Teacher" pages to get practical ideas on how to use content from our most popular sections on StageofLife. Contact Us if you have a lesson plan to suggest from Stage of Life's content.

    Homeschooling Writing Resources Our writing resources are great for the classroom, but if you're a homeschooling student or parent, check out our free, homeschooling writing resources. Writing contests, educational resources, and homeschooling resources are updated here We only charge for the shipping and handling fee We've sent out over posters to Language Arts, Creative Writing, and English Teachers!